Current Selections – Products and Prices

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You will come to think of me as your Personal Shopper in Italy. I can show you many things about the experiences of living, eating and shopping in Italy, all in the comfort of your home. At this time of year, the markets are filled with asparagus, artichokes and winter vegetables. Some of the finest of the late season foods are dried for use all year.

There are dried porcini — the most magnificent mushrooms you’ll ever taste Their fragrance is almost overpowering in their dried form. It is earthy and reminds you of fields and warm fires.

PORCINI – Dried Mushrooms   (Boletus Edulis)
Italy delivered Dec 013 Porcini Prices
50 grams (about 1 cup) $30
70 grams $42
100 grams $60   (100 grams is about 3.5 oz)

3 oz. re-hydrates to about 1 pound of mushrooms

Heavenly in risotto, or any soup, stew or pasta dish
Heavenly in risotto, or any soup, stew or pasta dish

POMODORI SECCHI – SUNDRIED TOMATOES
These most beautiful, bright sun dried tomatoes you’ll ever see.
From Campagna, they are richly flavored and can be used dried or re-hydrated. Don’t forget to use any of the liquid used to hydrate – it’s very flavorful and can add a depth of flavor and richness to any dish.

3 oz.  Price: $ 17.00                         8 oz. $ 35.00       Their flavor is so intense, a little goes a long way.

Here’s a great recipe for a dried tomato vinaigrette. Lots of flavor and fresh taste for any kind of greens.

Sun-dried Tomato Vinaigrette

½ cup extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons white balsamic vinegar
2 tablespoons lemon juice
1 teaspoon sugar
½ teaspoon minced shallots
½ teaspoon chopped fresh herbs (any mix of basil, parsley, thyme, rosemary, mint)
2 tablespoons chopped dried tomatoes, rehydrated in tepid water for 10 min.
1 small clove minced garlic
Salt and ground black pepper to taste

Place all ingredients except oil in food processor and puree about 4-5 minutes. While processor is running, slowly drizzle oil into other ingredients. Yield is about 1 cup.

Campagna Sundried Tomatoes

I am so happy to be able to bring you spices from the world famous fresh market in Campo dei Fiori, Rome. This market has been in existence since the 13th century. While “Spezie Famose nel Mondo” (Famous spices of the world) has been there at least three generations, the Berardi brothers have increased the scale and size of their booth. Mauro has developed a way of flash freeze drying the spices so they retain their flavor a full two years if kept in the plastic bags they sell them in. Marco works in the booth, but I’m not sure he speaks any English, he’s the quiet brother. Marco, on the other hand is Mr. Personality and  is quick to pull out his notebook of press clippings from all over the world. While he promised for about ten years to create a website, I’m pretty certain it will never happen. BUT.. He has agreed to permit me to finally bring his spices to the US.

Spezie Famose nel Mondo
Spezie Famose nel Mondo

Right now, I have a number of the mixes:
The most popular is Campo dei Fiori Mix – it’s a combination of garlic, parsley, oregano, pepper, red pepper flakes and more.

Campo dei Fiori Mix –  2 oz.   $7.50,     4 oz. $14.00,   –    8 oz. $27.00

Puttanesca Mix    –  2 oz.   $7.50,    4 oz. $14.00,          –   8 oz. $27.00

Mauro’s Mix – This is without garlic and can be used with or without heat.     2 oz. $ 7.50,    4 oz.    $14.00   –    8 oz. $27.00

Red Pepper Flakes from Naples – Peperoncini
2 oz.  $ 7.00,    4 oz. $14.00     –    8 oz. $27.00

Cacio & Pepe – (This is really a extra fine ground pepper)
2 oz.  4.65,     4 oz. $ 9.50,       8 oz.   $18.80

L’Aquila Saffron threads .5 gram jar $20.00

I’ve still got some really flavorful, fruity extra virgin olive oil – it’s from the Tivoli area just outside Rome, made in a small commune that takes the olives from the tree to the frantoio (press) within 4 hours. It’s fresh, fruity and mostly to be used as that last drizzle on a dish before it’s served. The last little touch that makes anything outstandingly fresh and really fine tasting. I have a few 8 oz. bottles which are $20.

Olio Nuovo from Tivoli
Olio Nuovo from Tivoli

Please note our prices are based on current availability and exchange rates. Email your order requests and we’ll reply immediately with what we can deliver immediately. Contact me for information on how to order.

In April I will have Tuscan and Umbrian honeys, olive oils and jars of mostarda from the north. Mostarda is a delicious sweet-spicy condiment used on everything from cheese to meat dishes.
I’ll be in Tuscany (Florence, Orvieto, Siena) Umbria (Rieti, Spello, and probably Perugia) and Abruzzo (L’Aquila) and possibly Bari and Palermo. If you have any special requests please let me know and I’ll be happy to accommodate you.

Contact us for orders, questions or requests.

email:  expresslyitalian@aol.com

Ph:  310-337-1391 or  0039-339-674-0879

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Buon Natale – Christmas in Italy

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Christmas In Italy is a magical experience everyone should enjoy at least once.

In Italy it’s always about the food, so naturally, Italians revel in the holiday season. There are many special dishes served only at this time of year. There are regional baked goods that are unique to each area, although now more are available throughout Italy and even in the United States.  Panettone seems pretty easy to find these days, although, the ones shipped here for US consumption are not nearly as tasty or varied as those available in Italy.

I especially love the holiday markets which are throughout Italy. Although some of the biggest are in the northern part of the country like Trentino-Alto Adige and Emilia Romagna. Florence, Rome and Naples are also filled with the holiday spirit. The most famous market in Rome is in Piazza Navona. There are fewer crafts people and more mass-produced items in the market than in years past, but the spirit is still contagious.  Christmas Market, Piazza Navona

There’s lots of music, singing and families enjoying the season wandering from booth to booth around the fountains. It’s magical at night to see the fountains lit and flowing amidst the crowds.

Rome’s holiday season stretches much longer than ours. Christmas eve is the traditional feast of the 7 fishes (in some parts of Italy it’s 5, 9 or more or just ‘feast of the fishes’). Many families still hold strongly to this tradition, whether it’s actually 7 dishes or less. Usually there will be some fish antipasto, then a seafood pasta and definitely baccalà and anguilla (eel) if you are in Lazio. Christmas Day is less prescribed. It’s just enjoying family and as many dishes as you can imagine. Our most enjoyable Christmas in Rome was spent with our Italian family. I think we were 24 or 25 people in all. We managed to fill the room with a few tables and everyone moved around to talk with everyone else, while more and more food was served. And, then, Santo Stefano Day, which is the 26th of December. It’s a national holiday and often families will tour the nativity scenes (presepe) in town. In the town of Putignano in the region of Apulia they celebrate with a big Carnival, which, incidentally, is the oldest in the world and has been held for 616 years.

Generally, Italians celebrate the holiday season until January 6th, the feast of the epiphany. It is also the day La Befana arrives. And, the story of La Befana is one of my favorites. Gifts arrive with La Befana (the witch) who preceded Santa Claus and possibly even Christianity in much of Italy. Especially around Rome the tradition of La Befana is still very strong. The tale of La Befana, who was an old crone who was famous for cleaning her house and working in her kitchen is this. On the first Christmas, the Magi stopped by her house, asking directions to Bethlehem. She made them dinner and they told her, “We’re going to see the Christ child, want to come along?” “Impossible,” she replied. “There’s all these dishes to wash and the kitchen to sweep!” So the kings went on their way. Then, as the old woman was sweeping, it hit her: Did I make a terrible mistake? Could they really be going to see Jesus? She ran out the door to try to catch them holding onto her broom. She kept running, until her broom lifted her off the ground and she was flying.

La Befana
La Befana
And, she’s been flying the night sky on the Eve of the Epiphany ever since. She delivers goodies to children, hoping one of them is the Christ child. She knows no child has been perfect all year, so she fills their stockings with a mix of treats – coal (actually a really delicious black rock candy) and all types of sweets. I’ve brought back flying Le Befane for many of my friends who love this tradition as much as I do.

Have a wonderful holiday season. Felice Anno Nuovo (Happy New Year)